Why Does Bonita Unified Hire A New Chief of Schools Every Year?

For the second time in less than a year, Bonita Unified School District is looking for a new superintendent.

Gary Rapkin, the former superintendent retired last year and Kurt Madden, previously from Bear Valley Unified, was hired July 1. But as of March 4, Madden has been placed on paid administrative leave for 60 days, which also serves as his notice of unemployment, according to Board President Jim Elliot.

A few days later Ann Sparks, assistant superintendent of business services, was named acting superintendent. Then a few more days after that the retired Rapkin agreed to return as interim superintendent until a new one was found.

The Cosca Group was the firm that found Rapkin, and then found Madden. Because of Madden’s short time with the district, the firm is footing the bill for this current search, according to principal Steve Goldstone.

The firm, which has been around for 16 years, has never had to find a replacement for a district this soon.

The application process will open April 20 with a May 20 deadline. Interviews will occur June 4 and 6 and a choice will be finalized by July 1. If not, then Rapkin will continue as superintendent until a suitable replacement can be found.

But the question remains, what was wrong with Madden? And why can’t Bonita Unified keep a leader?

The district has yet to state why Madden was put on leave. But in providing a list of attributes for what the board wanted in a new leader, members kept the qualities from last year. And added resiliency, ability to identify technological needs, ability to guide and support the district cabinet, consistent leadership and direction, clear and effective decision-making skills and district office experience.

 

Read more at The Inland Valley Daily Bulletin


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