The Heroes of the Tehama School Shooting

The shooting that took place In Northern California last week took the lives of five people and left several others hospitalized.

But time and time again Californians have proven that where there is tragedy, there is also hope and healing. The school staff at Rancho Tehama Elementary School acted quickly as the shooter reached campus early Tuesday morning, helping to save the lives of dozens of children.

As soon as the first gunshots were heard, school secretary Sara Lobdell immediately put the school on lockdown. Staff began rushing around to get any and every student and parent into any open room they could and out of harm’s way.

Custodian John Hayburn began rallying students in the play area to get inside and then proceeded to make contact with the shooter creating a distraction that allowed for the other staff members to finishing filing children into classrooms.

A first- and second-grade teacher, Jennifer Bauman, grabbed multiple fourth and fifth graders into her classroom and then held herself against the door to prevent the shooter from getting in. The older children comforted the younger ones as they braced for the worst.

Corning Unified School District Superintendent Richard Fitzpatrick did not hesitate to acknowledge the "heroic actions of all the members of school staff" that took place that morning.

As we prepare for the holidays, here at CalSchoolNews we are thankful for the heroic educators that not only oversee our children every day, but also go to these extra efforts for what has become an all-too-common occurrence.

 

The district has posted helpful resources on its webpage as well as information for anyone who would like to donate to the Rancho Tehama Support Fund. You can go to the North Valley Community Foundation to make a donation, or call Alexa at 530.891.1150. For answers to any other donation questions you may have, email Ann Bates or call 530.824.7701 ext. 1256.


Comments

Curriculum

Tuesday, September 5, 2017 - 18:59

The long standing tradition of building a California mission from art materials, or assembling one from a pre-made craft store kit, will soon go the way of the dodo.