LAUSD Pays SAT Fees for 4,000 Students

More than 4,000 Los Angeles Unified students were able to take the SATs this week thanks to a new program from the district that helped alleviate test taking costs.

Traditionally, College Board will issue a fee waiver for low-income students to be able to take the test. But this year, Los Angeles Unified helped cover the costs as well.

The “SAT School Day” took place for juniors at all 29 high schools in Local District South.

“We believe that providing these tests will help students raise their expectations for taking the SAT and attending college,” said Christopher Downing, superintendent, Local District South. “It may inspire students to improve upon their academic strengths and weaknesses, during their senior year, putting them in a better position to attend college.”

“Cost should never be an impediment to education and career pathways," said Board Member Dr. Richard Vladovic.

Taking the free test is one part of Local District South’s plan for helping students transition to college. Over the past two years, Local District South has created partnerships with colleges and universities, including agreements for priority enrollment at California State University at Dominguez Hills and Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science.

“This is a great opportunity for our students, and we thank everyone who made this happen for them,” said Interim Superintendent Vivian Ekchian.

Other innovative programs, in Local District South, include all middle and high schools offering courses from local community colleges for college credit. Students have the opportunity to take these courses concurrently with their L.A. Unified courses and, in some cases, they can even earn an Associate of Arts degree upon graduation from high school.

What’s more, all high school students in L.A. Unified can attend community colleges in Los Angeles for one year free of charge as part of the District’s L.A. College Promise.


Comments

Curriculum

Tuesday, September 5, 2017 - 18:59

The long standing tradition of building a California mission from art materials, or assembling one from a pre-made craft store kit, will soon go the way of the dodo.