Lemon Grove Superintendent is Headed to the Mill Valley School District

After two years at the helm, Dr. Kimberly Berman is leaving her position as superintendent of the Lemon Grove School District in San Diego County. She has been appointed superintendent of the Mill Valley School District in Marin, effective July 1.

Dr. Berman’s departure was preceded by controversy. A number of parents and teachers have been trying to foment her ouster after she and other board members reportedly pressured 16 probationary teachers to step down. The school district informed them it did not have the funds to invite them back for another year, which incensed some. Her opponents are still dissatisfied and want other board members to resign as well.

Dr. Berman used to work as an educator and Gifted Consultant for school districts in Ohio. Before accepting the job in Lemon Grove, she served as assistant superintendent and superintendent for the Greenfield Union School District. She holds a Doctor of Philosophy in Curriculum and Instruction with an emphasis in Gifted and Talented Education from the University of Toledo and serves on the advisory board for the Fiscal Crisis and Management Team in California.

The Lemon Grove School District said the following in its statement about Dr. Berman’s departure:

“It has been our pleasure to work with Dr. Berman for the past two years. During her recent evaluation, the Board extended an offer of a 4-year contract for Dr. Berman to continue to work with Lemon Grove Learners. While we are sad to see her move forward, we appreciate her dedication to our staff, students and community. During her tenure, we saw tremendous growth and are confident that she has established sustainable systems to continue our same path. Dr. Berman will remain with the district through the end of June."

Erica Balakian has been appointed interim superintendent.

Read more about Dr. Berman’s new role here


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